Transfer of Learning Study Recently Reported

This post is provided by guest blogger, Michele Cote, graduate student at the University of St. Francis in Joliet, MS in Training and Development program.

John P. Egan (2020) reported results of a study conducted at a large Canadian research university about transfer of learning. Participants were global and completed an online Likert scale questionnaire. Egan (2020) noted in his article that when instructional design is used including specific learning activities and reflection, then transfer of learning seems to increase. Participants also felt that an e-learning toolkit and scenario-based learning helped them retain information. The studied course also included a community of practice and participants agreed it was important. However, it was inconclusive if the community of practice, especially if digital, aided in the transfer of learning.    

Egan (2020), Director of the Learning and Teaching Unit, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Aucklan reported the study results quantitatively and cited other well-known references in his article. He defined transfer of learning for the purpose of the study noting it as behavioral with a measurable increase in skill or ability (Caffarella, 2002). He also mentioned that cognitive factors and motivation play a role in transfer of learning (Goldstone & Day, 2012). The article would be helpful for anyone interested in transfer of learning, and the outcomes of the study can be applied to many different settings.

References

Caffarella, R. S. (2002). Planning programs for adult learners: A practical guide for educators, trainers, and staff developers (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Egan, J. P. (2020). Beyond the afterglow: Effective transfer of learning through instructional design. Teaching & Learning Inquiry, 8(1).             http://dx.doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.8.1.12

Goldstone, R. L., & Day, S. B. (2012). Introduction to New conceptualizations of transfer of learning. Educational Psychologist, 47 (3), 149-152. https://doi.org/10.1080/00461520.2012.695710

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s